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Traditional Wedding Attire Around the World - The Crescent Beach Club
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Traditional Wedding Attire Around the World

Traditional Wedding Attire Around the World

At a wedding everyone is waiting for the big reveal of the bridal gown when the bride walks down the aisle. When you think of wedding gowns, a white ball gown with lace might be the first thing you think of.  But different cultures around the world have other designs in mind. From bold colors to elaborate structural designs, traditional wedding attire varies vastly from culture to culture. Through these gorgeous garments, you’re often able to quickly determine the couple’s heritage, religion, and culture.

Some of the most striking traditional wedding attire from across the globe

While the western world has completely embraced the traditional white ball gown, other cultures have a more extravagant design. Indian weddings are massive, gorgeous affairs filled with color, texture, music, and creative design elements. Their traditional wedding attire is among the most iconic when it comes to brightly colored outfits. Women often wear pink or red colored saris. The color red represents the rising sun and Mars in India, which are thought to bring fertility and prosperity.

Another culture with breathtaking wedding attire is Ghana. Brides and grooms often wear matching attire in bright, bold colors with exciting and eye-catching patterns. Their attire is made of a cloth they call kente which they hand weave in Ghana. 

Another beautiful African country that has iconic wedding attire is Nigeria. Their looks are elaborate, colorful, and structurally exciting, but perhaps the most iconic piece of attire is the gele, a head tie scarf worn by Nigerian brides.

Moving along from color to structure is the intricate wedding attire from Japan. Japanese weddings pay tribute to the clean lines and colors found throughout their country and in traditional cultural art. It is common to see a Japanese bride wearing a pure white kimono during the ceremony symbolizing purity. For the reception she transforms into a vision of red symbolizing good luck. 

Japanese Wedding Attire

According to Business Insider, a traditional Iraqi bride might set the record for the most wardrobe changes. Brides in Iraq have a total of seven dresses, each representing a different color of the rainbow.

Another culture known for their traditional patterns and colors is Scotland. During Scottish weddings, grooms wear a kilt representing the pattern and colors from their family. After the ceremony, the bride wears a shawl with the same colors and pattern of the groom symbolizing her transition.

Scottish Wedding Attire

Where did the white ball gown come from?

While color is key to many cultures across the world for wedding attire, in the United States, white ranks supreme. Contrary to popular belief, white was not always the traditional color of brides in America. Back in the 19th century, women wore their best outfits as white was incredibly difficult to clean by hand. Having white clothing was reserved for the wealthy who could afford the labor it took to clean the fabrics. This all changed in 1840 when Queen Victoria married Prince Albert in a stunning white lace gown. Similar to how celebrities and royals have shaped fashion throughout time, this white gown immediately influenced gowns desired by brides. It began as a trend reserved for the elite and has become the traditional wedding attire in western cultures today.

White lace gown

No matter what your traditional wedding attire looks like, The Crescent Beach Club’s waterfront venue is the perfect setting to match with any theme. Whether you opt for bright colors or wear crisp white, the crashing waves and sandy shores will compliment your look. Fill out our form or call us at 516-628-3000 to schedule a tour and wow your guests with a gorgeous waterfront wedding to remember!